International TECHstyle Art Biennial, Back and Better than Ever!

International TECHstyle Art Biennial, Back and Better than Ever!

The other afternoon I spent in an art museum. But unlike any art museum I've been to, every piece exhibited related in some way to the craft of weaving, sewing, and embroidery. This is the San Jose Museum of Quilts and Textiles, and being someone who never took up the loom or the needle extensively, I was eager to see the fantastic art pieces this medium could produce. Currently, the Museum is exhibiting their International TECHstyle Art Biennial. All pieces in this exhibit was chosen by jury for theme of Textiles and Technology somehow working together. Artists come from a range of locations including the U.S., Australia, and Korea. For more information on the event please visit this page http://zero1biennial.org/san-jose-museum-quilts-textiles . Curator Deborah Corsini took me around to many of the exhibits, below is a selection of some of my favorites.

Pixilated Forest, by Christine Spangler. Made with a Jacquard woven technique(computer aided weaving) and designed originally in Photoshop. From close up the piece looks like a bunch of woven pixels, erratic and unrelated, but from afar, there is an impressive image of a forest. The complex subject matter whats highly aided by the manner by which it was fabricated. In the artist's own words. “These processes give me a great deal of control over the color, texture, drape and images in my fabrics and allow me to personalize my artistic expression.” (Spangler)

http://www.flickr.com/photos/01sj/7931461112/in/photostream

View Source, by Pattie Shaw. This piece had HTML code written in bleach discharge and embroidery on a cotton, whole cloth quilt. The idea of high tech information storage in the form of code written through this more primitive method of bleach discharge draws a nice contrast. “The language is beautiful in its own way and reminds me of Egyptian hieroglyphics.” (Shaw) Corsini pointed out the several zeros and ones present in the pieces quilting. Whether or not this is a reference to the partnership with ZERO1 or the binary language which inspired our name is still up for debate.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/01sj/7931398932/in/photostream

Yumika Tanaka, a local artist has a set of Japanese kimono on display. These two pieces are meant to stitch together the past and present. The form of this traditional Japanese garment is the base for the artwork, with hand stitched images of the modern-day San Francisco Highways on each. While one depicts a sun-lit day image. The other shows the same image with a pre-programmed sequence of lights running along the illustrated streets in a stunning night scene. I felt this was quite beautifully done with a very clear, delightful message.


http://www.flickr.com/photos/01sj/7932168744/in/photostream